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Many of the seekers were divorced, and looking for an alternative to the carousel of what the authors of “Courtship American Style” call “the tedious and meaningless …round of bars and singles’ clubs.” One ad says the writer is looking for “a little fun and excitement and a lot of deep down feeling but not wedding bliss (I’ve gone that route).” “The ads in this paper read a little like the ask-bid columns of the New York Stock Exchange,” wrote those authors, Catherine Cameron, Stuart Oskamp, and William Sparks.People having unprotected sex, things that I did when I was in Europe …” Her dating life from that period found its way into the paper.

“There were about 25 or 30 responses to the 40s ad,” she says, “but there were over 200 to the 20s one, including doctors, lawyers, and several from prison.” In her paper, men’s ads skewed a little older, women’s slightly younger.

Despite proposals from nine separate men, she says, she never married or had children, and has no regrets about a life spent traveling, collecting vintage clothing, and dabbling in real estate.

(Though she does regret passing on an additional apartment in her building when it was listed at 5,000—it’s now worth 0,000.) One of her books, Although she says she hasn’t had a date in a while, many of her recent beaux have been much younger. She has no intention of slowing down, but she finds the idea of online dating “terrifying” and unromantic.

(Correspondingly, the men seem to have fudged a little—many listed their height as at least one inch above the average.).

The paper, Appleberg says, was fashioned after an English singles magazine.

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