Dating of the new testament writings

The reason for the variations is that each author wrote to a different audience and from his own unique perspective.

Matthew wrote to a Jewish audience to prove to them that Jesus is indeed their Messiah.

But some of the language and theology point to a much later date, from an unknown author using Paul's name.c. The elegance of the Greek and the sophistication of the theology do not fit the genuine Pauline epistles, but the mention of Timothy in the conclusion led to its being included with the Pauline group from an early date.c. This is apparently the latest writing in the New Testament, quoting from Jude, assuming a knowledge of the Pauline letters, and including a reference to the gospel story of the Transfiguration of Christ. The references to "brother of James" and to "what the apostles of our Lord Jesus Christ foretold" suggest that it was written after the apostolic letters were in circulation, but before 2 Peter, which uses it.

Skeptics have criticized the Gospels, the first four books of the New Testament, as being legendary in nature rather than historical.

With that insight, near the end of his life John sat down and wrote the most theological of all the Gospels.

We should expect some differences between four independent accounts.

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John wrote after reflecting on his encounter with Christ for many years.

The Greek version was probably finalised in the early Persian period and translated into Greek in the 3rd century BCE, and the Hebrew version dates from some point between then and the 2nd century BCE.

The Book of Ezekiel describes itself as the words of the Ezekiel ben-Buzi, a priest living in exile in the city of Babylon, and internal evidence dates the visions to between 593 and 571 BCE.

Noth's dating was based on the assumption that the history was completed very soon after its last recorded event, the release of King Jehoiachin in Babylon c.

560 BCE; but some scholars have termed his reasoning inadequate, and the history may have been further extended in the post-exilic period.

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